Clean Water Act

GAO warns Clean Water in Peril, rivers still fouled

Gaithersburg, MD – In a report released yesterday (Jan. 13, 2014), the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that more than 40 years after Congress approved the Clean Water Act, the majority of our nation’s waters continue to be impaired. The main cause is non-point source pollution – runoff from farms, roadways, and backyards across the country. The Izaak Walton League empowers citizens to respond to this growing threat by monitoring and restoring water quality in their communities. GAO concludes that “progress toward the Clean Water Act’s goals of restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters – including designated uses of fishing, swimming, and drinking – has stalled, largely because non-point source pollution has not been controlled.” GAO calls on Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take a range of actions to protect and restore America’s waters.  READ MORE »

State and Regional Water Boards and state Health Department run afoul of Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

 

Editor's note: The following is the sequel to a story posted at www.lloydgcarter.com on May 22.  It can be read here.  The following concerns California's abysmal efforts to meet goals set by the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act.

            By Patrick Porgans and Lloyd G. Carter

            Forty-one years ago, a united Congress overrode President Nixon's veto of the Clean Water Act (CWA), which ordered states to limit pollutants in the nation's waterways. Coupled with subsequent amendments, the CWA required all states to assess and establish Total Maximum Daily Limits (TMDLs) of pollutants for lakes, creeks, rivers, estuaries and ocean shorelines.  If the states wouldn't do it, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) could step in and impose safety limits.

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